News/Events

July 7th, 2014

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Topic Events
September 3rd, 2014

womensfitness_Aug29_ADo you enjoy marveling at the exciting exploits of superheroines on the big screen as these female forces champion all that is good in the world? Most women probably don't make any real comparisons between Wonder Woman and themselves but you can be the star of your own life and a real inspiration to others by leading a fit and healthy life. Is it time you channelled your inner health heroine?
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September 2nd, 2014

exercisegeneral_Aug29_AEven if you absolutely love everything to do with keeping fit and working out, everybody needs a touch of inspiration to fuel their motivation levels. What gets you going and what keeps you going? Or are you still stuck in the stalls planning ahead but never quite starting? Whether you feel you can't, have come to a standstill on a fitness plateau or are lacking the gumption in the first place, you need to feel inspired!
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August 27th, 2014

womensfitness_Aug25_AIs stress making some women overweight? According to a recent study it could be. As if the fact that some foods make you put on weight isn't bad enough, now a new study suggests that stress can potentially exacerbate the effect of high-fat foods on women's bodies by slowing down metabolism and, as a result, speeding up weight-gain. Exercise can be an effective way to dissipate the stresses and strains of everyday life.
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August 26th, 2014

exercisegeneral_Aug25_ATrotting along like a horse; hitting an imaginary ball on an imaginary court in your own home; moving your hips hula style while sitting down; risking injury with dangerous physical challenges; and walking to the next bar; it seems there is no end to the interesting, strange and downright weird trends some people follow in the name of fitness. While some quirky fitness trends turn into international sensations, such as the party-atmosphere vibe of Zumba, others fail fast. What's definitely constant is that there is never a dull moment in the world of wacky workouts.

Prancersice

Developing her own unique exercise style in the 80s, before the advent of social media, Joanna Rohrback saw her Prancersize routines go viral as she became an Internet exercise star with many fans galloping alongside her. Prancersize involves a way of moving that resembles the trotting gait of a horse as you move forward with a spring in your step. It certainly looks different than the usual run in the park!

Wii Fit

For legions of couch lovers, the Wii brought sport into the living room and brought whole families in from the sidelines of spectator sports into the real action. From tennis to soccer and golf, where there's a Wii there's a way to enjoy virtual activities. However, while the competitive spirit may soar and you may work up a sweat developing balance, agility and skill with intense Wii sessions, is it really a substitute for working out?

Hawaii Chair

The humor of the idea of a chair that will apparently keep you fit while you are sitting down didn't escape Ellen Degeneres, who featured the Hawaii Chair on her show. What looks like an innocent enough chair is transformed with the touch of a button as the seat moves to create a hula style movement from your waist down. While the informercial seems to suggest that this is a great exercise device to use at work, some might prefer to get up and walk over to where we are at instead…

Bar crawl

Hiking to inns along a scenic route may sound a little healthier than hopping from bar to bar in an urban setting, however, make no mistake a bar crawl is just that, no matter how wholesome-sounding you might dress it up. Of course, it can be fun to go for a long walk and find yourself at a refreshing watering hole or inviting restaurant at the end of your jaunt. However, calorie-rich liquid carbohydrate beverages are not usually on the menu during an effective workout!

Extreme obstacle courses

If you have ever been part of an exercise boot camp then you may have some understanding of just how effective a good physical challenge can be, especially when exercises are varied with obstacle-course style workouts. However, while high intensity interval training (HIIT) may be a fitness trend hit, intense does not equal dangerous. Being covered in mud, exhausted and attempting a physical feat that might leave you injured is not a demonstration of fitness. Extreme fitness events can involve all sorts of wacky physical challenges and while there's no reason that fun needs to be taken out of fitness, safety must come first.
Published with permission from FitnessAdvisory. Source.

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August 24th, 2014

exercisegeneral_Aug15_AGoing for a run seems to have somehow lost its standing in the exciting mix of exercise programs. However, a new study suggests that not only can running promote longevity, you don't have to commit to an intense amount of sprinting at a fast pace to really reap the health benefits. The findings suggest that running just a small amount can lower the risk of fatal cardiovascular disease or stroke by a staggering 45%. Do you need to run for your life?

The study

Researchers from the Iowa State University Kinesiology Department took data from the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study, looking at the running patterns of all ages of adults, with over 55,000 participants over a 15 year period. The aim of the study was to determine a link between running and longevity.

The results

What is interesting about the study results is that regardless of factors such as sex, age, BMI and some other health conditions, the benefits of running were found to be the same. The study suggests that on average, longevity in those who run is extended by three years compared to non-runners. Other findings include a 30% lower risk of mortality from all causes compared to those who never ran.

You don't need to run fast or far!

You do not have to set off on a marathon sprint or think that you have to run around the globe to really feel the benefits or running either, according to the study. And this is the really motivating factor, as the study suggests that whether you run less than an hour a week or more than three hours longevity is not necessarily affected. Those who ran at a rate less than six miles per hour, for less than an hour, once or twice a week, still benefited in terms of longevity in comparison to those who did not run.

Keep on going for years to come!

Another important result to come out of the Iowa study focuses on running over time. The results suggest that those who ran over a continuous period of six years, rather than sporadically, benefited from significant health positives, such as a 50% lower risk of fatal cardiovascular disease or stroke, compared to non-runners.

The wind in your hair!

If you haven't put on your running shoes for a while then perhaps it is time to just pick up a bit of speed to get moving beyond a stroll. Adding some running into your cardio and stretching routines can be a great way to really work your whole body too. As well as the potential health benefits, there is something wonderful about going for a run. If you need reminding how great a run feels then then here are a few thoughts:
  • You feel cleansed mentally as you meditate on each step and leave stresses behind.
  • You can really explore a new area when you go for a run.
  • You can get out into the open and breathe in some fresh-air to awaken the senses and energize your whole being.
  • You can enjoy the scenery of the local park or green area.
  • You can add in some practical elements, such as running for a purpose, whether it is a run to the shop or a charity sprint.
  • You don't need any special equipment and as well as your training program with us, you can pretty much run wherever you are.
  • Running is free!
  • Running exercises your whole body.
  • You can feel the wind in your hair!
With so many benefits and with running being such a positive exercise experience there seems little reason to not get into the rhythm of running for your health with us.
Published with permission from FitnessAdvisory. Source.

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